Life-saving defibrillators installed at five Banbury playing fields

Banbury Town Council have installed five life-saving defibrillators at playing fields around town.
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The installation of the new life-saving equipment is intended to make sports safer for all, but particularly for people with hidden heart problems.

If someone suffers a cardiac arrest during a game or activity, they can now receive immediate treatment during the crucial period before emergency services reach the scene.

Found at Hanwell Fields, Horton View, Easington Rec, Moorfields, and Chandos Close playing fields, the defibrillators are a key part of the council’s commitment to get people active in a safe way.

Cllr Phillips (right) and Paul Almond, the town council’s Environment Officer, examine the defib at Horton View sportsground.Cllr Phillips (right) and Paul Almond, the town council’s Environment Officer, examine the defib at Horton View sportsground.
Cllr Phillips (right) and Paul Almond, the town council’s Environment Officer, examine the defib at Horton View sportsground.

Cllr Martin Phillips, chairman of the council’s general services committee, said: "The defibs are attached to the pavilions at all five council sports fields, and the move is in line with the council’s commitment to encourage people to get active and play more sport as safely as possible."

"It is not uncommon to hear of people with no history of heart problems who suddenly collapse during a sports event, and the potentially life-saving defibrillators will help them and anyone else who needs them.

"If they help save the life of a single member of our community, they will have been worth the investment of £7,500."

A defibrillator applies an electric charge to the heart to restore a normal heartbeat. If the heart rhythm stops due to cardiac arrest, also known as sudden cardiac arrest, a defibrillator may help it start beating again.

Anyone who sees a person having a cardiac arrest should call 999, start CPR, and get someone to locate a defibrillator. The defibrillator should be turned on and its instructions followed.