Lancaster Bomber to fly over Banbury as town commemorates Battle of Britain

A Lancaster Bomber will fly over Banbury to commemorate the Battle of Britain – and the vital role the town played in one of the most crucial conflicts of World War Two.
Watch more of our videos on Shots! 
and live on Freeview channel 276
Visit Shots! now

The commemorations of the battle will take place on Sunday September 17, and will also feature a military and civic parade through the town centre.

Organised by the town council, the highlight of the day promises to be the flypast of the iconic aircraft at 1.56pm, when it will fly above Horsefair.

The day will pay respects to the lives lost in the battle and also revive memories of Banbury’s important behind-the-scenes role in the battle.

One of the iconic aircraft of the Battle of Britain, a Lancaster Bomber, will fly over the town this month to commemorate the battle.One of the iconic aircraft of the Battle of Britain, a Lancaster Bomber, will fly over the town this month to commemorate the battle.
One of the iconic aircraft of the Battle of Britain, a Lancaster Bomber, will fly over the town this month to commemorate the battle.

Leader of the town council Kieron Mallon said: "This event is a sincere tribute to those who defended this country in the most courageous way. Many lost their lives, and they and those who survived the battle must never be forgotten."

During the war years, Banbury’s aluminium factory (then the NAC, later Alcan, but known locally as The Ally) supplied much of the country’s aircraft industry needs.

The factory, which was the largest producer of aircraft metal in the country, produced aluminium for the manufacture of RAF planes, including Spitfires and Lancaster bombers.

Julian Dancer from the town said: "To deceive German bombers and protect the site from air raids, the real factory was camouflaged and a decoy building was erected north of the town.

"The fake factory, known as the dummy ally, was built in fields near Great Bourton. The plan worked. The real factory was never bombed, while the decoy was targeted on October 3, 1940.

"The fake factory was dismantled soon after the war, but the dummy gateposts remained until the 1970s."

This year’s Battle of Britain Day parade will leave Broad Street at midday, march up High Street into Horsefair, and then go to St Mary’s Church for a memorial service.

Cllr Mallon said: "Banbury is one of a number of towns across the country that commemorate the Battle of Britain every year. We are proud to do so, and even though the town’s aluminium factory has gone, we should not forget the part it and its workers played in the war."

Related topics: