Banbury Town Council pays tribute to Prince Philip, who visited Banbury in 2008

Banbury Town Council acknowledges with deep sadness the death of Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, who died at Windsor Castle today (Friday April 9).

Friday, 9th April 2021, 1:29 pm
Updated Friday, 9th April 2021, 3:36 pm

Banbury Town Council offers its sincerest condolences to all members of the Royal Family.

The council is certain that throughout the town residents will express their sorrow at the Duke’s passing.

Prince Philip was an exceptional person who was admired and respected at home and around the world for his energy and devotion to duty and for his loyalty to the queen.

Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, during his visit to Banbury in 2008 (Image from Banbury Guardian archives)

Cllr Kieron Mallon, leader of Banbury Town Council, said: “Prince Philip was always at the Queen’s side. They were married in 1947 and he was her ‘rock.’ He devoted his life to Queen and country and will be greatly missed."

Cllr Steve Kilsby, leader of the council’s Labour group, said: “Prince Philip was an exceptional person who was admired and respected at home and around the world for his energy and devotion to duty.

“The Duke of Edinburgh award scheme, which he initiated, has put many young people on the right track.”

Town mayor Cllr John Colegrave said: “Prince Philip was devoted to his royal duties. He will be remembered with affection for many reasons. Our thoughts are with his family.”

Prince Philip and the Queen during their visit to Banbury in 2008 (Image from Banbury Guardian archives)

Banbury Town Council will follow official procedures following the death of Prince Philip and full details can be found by logging on to www.banbury.gov.uk

Prince Philip visited Banbury with the Queen in November 2008, which the Banbury Guardian covered.

Here is the story of their visit to Banbury Town Hall from the December 4, 2008 edition recovered from our archives.

Banbury Guardian edition: December 4, 2008:

Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, during his visit to Banbury in 2008 (Image from Banbury Guardian archives)

The Queen arrived at Banbury Town Hall last Thursday (November 27, 2008) amid a flurry of flags waved by thousands of onlookers.

Crowds cheered as she stepped out of her car and greeted the High Sheriff of Oxfordshire, Brigadier Ian Inshaw, local councillors Tony Crabbe, Andrew Fulljames and Kieron Mallon, Banbury MP

Tony Baldry and his wife Pippa, and town mayor Ann Bonner.

Her Majesty then made her way inside the town hall to meet Banbury town councillors and examine the town’s 1608 Charter.

Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, during his visit to Banbury in 2008 (Image from Banbury Guardian archives)

She was followed by her husband Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh.

Mrs Bonner said: “It all seems like a dream now but we made an awful lot of people happy in Banbury on Thursday and I even dare to think we made Her Majesty happy too.”

The Queen was met by about 150 people in the town hall and was introduced to individuals by Mrs Bonner.

The Duke of Edinburgh also mingled with community members.

There was then a fanfare in honour of the royal couple, who stepped up on to a dais and were thanked for coming during a welcome speech made by Mrs Bonner.

The Queen unveiled a plaque to commemorate the visit and the royal couple signed the visitors book and an official photograph of themselves; the duke raised a laugh by asking what the date was! They were then presented with a posy and local gifts before making their way outside to meet members of the public.

Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, during his visit to Banbury in 2008 (Image from Banbury Guardian archives)

Mrs Bonner said: “Looking back on the day it is the funny moments that stay in one’s memory. The totally relaxed and warm atmosphere in the hall and how relaxed and happy the royal couple looked, the moment when Prince Philip spoke to the clockwinder of the town hall clock and took his own watch out of his pocket and told him our clock was four minutes fast, the moment when Her Majesty asked the county archivist what had happened to the Great Seal of England on the Charter and asked him if he had lost it, the moment when we all stood waiting for the fanfare from the young cornet player in the Minstrels Gallery and she had mislaid her music – and the Queen recognised her as being one of the three young sisters she had just met.”

Cllr Kieron Mallon, leader of Banbury Town Council, also helped organise the visit.

He said: “The day really showed Banbury in its best light, people turned out in their thousands.

“We had 3,000 school children alone. High Street and Broad Street was a sea of red, white and blue. Everybody got behind the visit and the Queen seemed genuinely touched by the massive turnout.”