New name but same purpose for UK charity

Middleton Cheney assistance dog partnership Karen Williams with her assistance dog Iggy, who is wearing his new assistance dog jacket. Dogs for the Disabled have rebranded to Dogs for Good. NNL-150610-122840001
Middleton Cheney assistance dog partnership Karen Williams with her assistance dog Iggy, who is wearing his new assistance dog jacket. Dogs for the Disabled have rebranded to Dogs for Good. NNL-150610-122840001

Banbury-based national charity Dogs for the Disabled will be operating under a different name from next week.

From October 15, the charity will be known as Dogs for Good.

The decision was made by the charity’s board of trustees after independent research with groups and individuals who use the charity.

The charity says over the past 10 years it has broadened its services including providing training assistance dogs for physically disabled children and children with autism, running workshops and providing support to look at how a pet dog can help families with a child with autism.

According to Dogs for the Disabled, its research showed the current name reflected ‘only one view of disability’ and the new name would better reflect the range of services offered by the charity.

Chief executive Peter Gorbing said the charity’s new name reflected the good dogs did in society.

“We started with the assumption dogs are good for all of us and when you bring people and dogs together, incredible things happen,” he said. “We wanted a name that celebrated the great things dogs do and to give us scope for exploring the contribution dogs make to our society.”

He added the new name would encourage more people to engage with the charity.

“Going through a rebranding is complicated and there is a lot to think about. One of the benefits, which has also been a challenge is it forces us to think deeply about what we do, how we do it and how we want to portray that. It has been hugely energising for the charity as well.”

He added the language around disability had changed over the years and the charity wanted the new name to reflect that.

“We are keen to put on record what we have achieved over the past 27 years and we don’t see the rebranding as eliminating the past as we have achieved great things, but every now and again organisations have to take stock of where they are and make changes for the long term.

“It very much focuses on what we will look like in 10 years time and makes sure we reflect the values of the organisation.”

He added the charity was proud of its links with Banbury, where it has been based since 2000, and was keen to keep developing those links in the future.

A spokesperson said the rebranding had cost in the region of £44,000, but the charity had received sponsorship for its new uniforms.