Lloyds Bank in Banbury joins in with firm’s 250th birthday celebrations

From L-R: Rowan George, Kamran Farooq, bank manager, Jenni Whiting with Brian Little and Dejan Arambasic, assistant manager at the branch's historical display to mark the bank's 250th anniversary. NNL-150506-103936001
From L-R: Rowan George, Kamran Farooq, bank manager, Jenni Whiting with Brian Little and Dejan Arambasic, assistant manager at the branch's historical display to mark the bank's 250th anniversary. NNL-150506-103936001

Banbury historian Brian Little was at the town’s Lloyds Bank yesterday (Thursday) as the company celebrates its 250th anniversary.

Branches across the country have held their own events throughout the week to celebrate the milestone, and staff at the Banbury branch on the High Street asked Mr Little to compile a history of the firm’s presence in the town.

Mr Little spent the morning speaking to customers as he manned a detailed display of the Banbury branch’s history, with contributions from the bank about its beginnings when it was founded in 1765.

Dejan Arambasic, assistant manager at the Banbury branch, said: “We have changed the way we do business and it much more customer focused. We now have a responsibilty to help people and we also support projects such as BYHP and also work with the council to help clean up the town’s parks.

“We knew of Mr Little in the town and how much he knows about its history, so one of our employees got in touch with him to ask if he would like to write a piece about the branch’s history.”

The store had 250th anniversary balloons to give to children during the week, and were also raising funds for Children in Need. There was also a prize draw for a customer to win a Children in Need-themed bike.

Customers could also collect sets of ten collectable postcards, each detailing a separate story from the bank’s history, and copies of their special commemorative newspaper Lloyds Bank News.

Mr Little added he was ‘hugely delighted’ to be involved with the branch in its celebrations.

He said: “My father opened an account for me when I was younger, so there is a personal history with me and the bank. Its presence in the town goes back a long way and the building hasn’t really changed much and looks similar to what it did 100 years ago.”