Pioneering Horton hospital hip fracture team shortlisted for award

The Horton General Hospital hip fracture team. (L-R) Jillian Hewitt-Gray (consultant anaesthetist), Louise Garrett (ward manager), Angela Kannan (consultant orthogeriatrician), Charlotte Woodward (emergency department dister), Sam Anand (consultant trauma surgeon), Luke Souter (physiotherapy assistant) and Hannah Perkins (trauma specialist physiotherapist)
The Horton General Hospital hip fracture team. (L-R) Jillian Hewitt-Gray (consultant anaesthetist), Louise Garrett (ward manager), Angela Kannan (consultant orthogeriatrician), Charlotte Woodward (emergency department dister), Sam Anand (consultant trauma surgeon), Luke Souter (physiotherapy assistant) and Hannah Perkins (trauma specialist physiotherapist)

A pioneering team who have transformed hip fracture treatment at the Horton General Hospital in Banbury are shortlisted for a The British Medical Journal award.

Consultants Sam Anand, Angela Kannan, Jillian Hewitt-Gray and a multi-disciplinary team which includes nurses, physiotherapists and operating theatre staff are shortlisted in the 'patient safety' category of the 2018 awards.

The Banbury team have been shortlisted after remarkable improvements in the quality of care they provide for patients who suffer a fractured neck of femur (broken hip) when the top part of the bone is broken.

Dr Kannan said: “We are delighted to have been shortlisted as a team for The BMJ Awards.

"We have been inspired by the British cycling team and the Japanese concept of Kaizen.

"Using the theory of marginal gains – the huge difference which a large number of small changes can make to our patients – we are committed to continuously improving our service.

“Many of our patients are older people whose lives can be dramatically impacted by a hip fracture which can rob them of their confidence.

"By operating as soon as possible and then working as a team to support their rehabilitation, we can get them back on their feet and help them maintain their independence.”

In 2011 9.5 per cent of patients who had a hip fracture operation at the Horton died within 30 days of surgery.

In response, Dr Kannan was appointed, frail elderly patients were prioritised on operating theatre lists, operating hours were increased to make better use of theatre time, and physiotherapy was provided at weekends.

This complete culture change has transformed the quality of care and now less than three per cent of patients die, compared with a national average of 6.7 per cent.

The Horton has been ranked in the top five performing hospitals for the treatment of patients with hip fractures for the last five years running – achieving the number one ranking in 2017.

The average length of time which patients spend in the Horton General following hip fracture surgery has been reduced from 22 days in 2011 to 16 days now, compared with a national average length of stay of 22 days.

The full shortlist for awards is available at thebmjawards.bmj.com/shortlist-2018. The winners will be announced at an awards ceremony in London on May 10.