Great moment in railway history remembered

Cynthia Turner unvielling the plaque on the side of 84 High Street. NNL-150329-124833009
Cynthia Turner unvielling the plaque on the side of 84 High Street. NNL-150329-124833009

The daughter of railway preservation pioneer Bill Trinder, Cynthia Turner, unveiled a plaque in Banbury town centre on Saturday to acknowledge the town’s place in the history of a movement which has become a global phenomenon.

It was at 84 High Street, now The Men’s Room, that shop owner Mr Trinder and friend Tom Rolt decided to save the Talyllyn
Railway in Wales.

Banbury Civic Society and the Talyllyn Railway Preservation Society joined forces for a plaque which records how the two men’s conversations in the shop led to the Talyllyn’s launch as the first preserved line in 1951.