Friends and family of man diagnosed with pancreatic cancer complete Wolf Run in his honour

Team V, including employees from Vocis, getting ready to take part in the Wolf Run near Leamington Spa. Mike Everitt, 54, is in the black jacket. NNL-150414-162939001
Team V, including employees from Vocis, getting ready to take part in the Wolf Run near Leamington Spa. Mike Everitt, 54, is in the black jacket. NNL-150414-162939001

Friends and family of a Hook Norton man who has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer took part in a challenge in his honour last weekend.

Mike Everitt, who co-founded Warwick-based automotive consultancy Vocis, was diagnosed with the cancer that has the worst survival rate of all in October last year.

His colleagues at Vocis, friends, wife Amanda, and sons Tom, 20, and Andrew, 18, took part in the Wolf Run on Saturday, a 10km off-road event near Leamington Spa to raise money for Pancreatic Cancer Research.

The run includes man-made and natural obstacles designed to test mental and physical strength.

The 36-strong team, calling themselves Team V, had to run, climb, jump, crawl and swim to the finish line.

Also taking part as part of the team were representatives from Vocis client companies including McLaren Automotive. And one of Vocis’ employees did the challenge dressed as Dr Frank-N-Furter from the Rocky Horror Show.

“I aim to be one of the few people that make it through to the other side of pancreatic cancer... That is my intention and I hope that is the outcome.”

Mike Everitt

Speaking to the Banbury Guardian, Mr Everitt, 54, said: “It was a windy and cold day compared to the Friday and everyone came back very wet and muddy and suitably taxed. It was a fantastic event and we even went above our target of raising £10,000. “It was an amazing thing from my point of view, watching these people who had taken time to get freezing cold and be covered in stinking mud. It was quite humbling really.”

When he was diagnosed, Mr Everitt was told his tumour was inoperable and underwent a course of chemotherapy. He is now undergoing radiotherapy and his tumour has already started to shrink.

It is hoped the treatment will shrink his tumour enough so it can be removed.

Mr Everitt said he was hopeful for the future. “I started the chemo in November and since then I have been dividing my life into blocks. I was surprised at how well I coped with therapy and I aim to be one of the few people that make it through to the other side of it and get cured. That is my intention and I hope that is the outcome.”

Mr Everitt worked his way up as an apprentice at Jaguar in the 1970s to help design the transmission and control system in the £1 million Bugatti Veyron, the fastest road car in the world.

Visit the team’s fundraising page at www.justgiving.com/vocis1. Only three in every 100 diagnosed with pancreatic cancer will survive for five years or more.