Fairytale to help little wearers of spectacles

Sam Game, 40, from Banbury, has published her first book, The Glasses Fairy, to help parents help their children wear glasses. NNL-150603-123740001
Sam Game, 40, from Banbury, has published her first book, The Glasses Fairy, to help parents help their children wear glasses. NNL-150603-123740001

A book designed to help children wear glasses has been written by a Banbury mum.

Sam Game, 40, has published her first book, The Glasses Fairy, a story book about a young fairy who doesn’t know what she wants to be when she grows up.

“I wanted something that was fun, exciting, and where I could tailor the rewards.”

Sam Game

That is until she has to wear glasses then, with a little help from the Fairy Godmother, she becomes the Glasses Fairy.

In the book, The Glasses Fairy visits children who have been wearing their glasses and gives them a reward at night.

As well as an enchanting story, the book contains notes for parents explaining how to get children to wear their glasses and what to try when they don’t.

Mrs Game, of Bramber Close, created the story for her own children, Matthew, now eight and Abigail, now 11, who both wear glasses.

She said: “My youngest, Matthew, had to start wearing glasses when he was 18 months old.

“I looked around to find out what books or advice were available and there was nothing that practically gave you tips on your child wearing glasses.

“So I came up with the Glasses Fairy, who like the Tooth Fairy gives rewards at night.”

She added: “I decided I would come up with my own magical story and I raised it with my children and they thought it was the best thing ever.

“I wanted something that was fun, exciting and where I could tailor the rewards.”

She added she came up with the story six years ago, but was unable to find an interested publisher. She has now published the book herself.

The book is illustrated by Rekha B, also from Banbury.

As well as an author, Mrs Game is a health visitor and trains multi-professional groups on managing children’s behaviour.

She said: “As a professional I know it’s important to follow prescribed advice, but as a mum I realise that isn’t always easy.”

She also has experience working in Ethiopia where she spent two years with her husband, Jonathan, from 2002.

She said: “My husband worked for a charity building houses and I ran a refugee programme.

“It was rewarding, it was jolly hard work. I worked with Sudanese refugees. Ethiopia was so basic it was unbelievable.

“I organised a mother and baby programme and we got children immunised. There were a lot of positives, but it was quite challenging.”

Mrs Game hopes to write another book in the near future.

The book is aimed at children up to the age of eight and is accompanied by a website – www.theglassesfairy.com – which has free colouring sheets, patching charts and fliers.

From the sale of each book, £1 will be donated to Sightsavers International, a charity which is aiming to eliminate avoidable blindness and support people who are irreversibly blind or disabled to live independently.

For more information on the charity, visit www.sightsavers.org