Everything you need to know about Harry Dunn and his family's fight for justice

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The six-month anniversary of the Northamptonshire crash which sparked an international scandal is tomorrow

It has now been six months since Harry Dunn's motorcycle was involved in the fatal crash with a car being driven by an American spy's wife on the wrong side of the road in Northamptonshire.

Anne Sacoolas' diplomatic immunity claim has seen the Charlton 19-year-old's family become known around the world as they campaign for justice.

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So much has happened since that fateful summer's evening in August last year, so here is everything you need to know about the case.

Harry DunnHarry Dunn
Harry Dunn | other

What happened to Harry six months ago?

The head-on crash on the B4031 just outside Croughton between Harry's Kawasaki motorcycle and Sacoolas' Volvo XC90 was at around 8.30pm on Tuesday, August 27.

Sacoolas, 42, has admitted to being in the right-hand carriageway at the time of the collision, which is reportedly supported by CCTV footage obtained by police.

Harry suffered serious injuries and was taken by ambulance, which took 42 minutes to arrive, to the John Radcliffe Hospital, where he died.

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Harry Dunn's family. (L-R) Bruce Charles, Charlotte Charles, Ciaran Charles, Radd Seiger, Tracey Dunn and Tim DunnHarry Dunn's family. (L-R) Bruce Charles, Charlotte Charles, Ciaran Charles, Radd Seiger, Tracey Dunn and Tim Dunn
Harry Dunn's family. (L-R) Bruce Charles, Charlotte Charles, Ciaran Charles, Radd Seiger, Tracey Dunn and Tim Dunn | jpimedia

Sacoolas' young son was also in the car with her but neither suffered serious injuries.

So why all the fuss?

Sacoolas initially co-operated with police but when officers went to formally interview her the next day, they were told she has diplomatic immunity.

Northamptonshire Police continued the investigation into the crash and applied for her diplomatic immunity to be waived.

Northamptonshire Police Chief Constable Nick Adderley at a press conference about Harry DunnNorthamptonshire Police Chief Constable Nick Adderley at a press conference about Harry Dunn
Northamptonshire Police Chief Constable Nick Adderley at a press conference about Harry Dunn | jpimedia

Then on September 16, the force is informed the waiver has been declined and Sacoolas has flown back to the US.

What is diplomatic immunity?

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Diplomatic immunity ensures diplomats are protected from a host country's laws, codified as international law in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations 1961.

The rule was applies to Sacoolas through her husband Jonathan, who was working for the US Air Force listening post at RAF Croughton at the time of the crash.

A protester outside RAF Croughton in support of Harry Dunn's familyA protester outside RAF Croughton in support of Harry Dunn's family
A protester outside RAF Croughton in support of Harry Dunn's family | jpimedia

There are conflicting arguments as to whether or not she should have ever had immunity and whether that no longer applied when she left the UK.

What did Harry's family do?

Harry's family was told Sacoolas had left the country on September 23, five days after the teenager's funeral at Banbury Crematorium.

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They had heard beforehand about her departure and criticised police for not telling them sooner but that was dwarfed by their anger towards the American driver.

On October 2, the Justice4Harry campaign was launched and the GoFundMe page was set up, which quickly received donations and currently sits at more than £126,000.

International media has picked up on the story, with Harry's parents talking openly about their anguish and urging Sacoolas to come back or for the authorities to step in.

The poster and floral tribute to Harry Dunn on the B4031 where the crash happenedThe poster and floral tribute to Harry Dunn on the B4031 where the crash happened
The poster and floral tribute to Harry Dunn on the B4031 where the crash happened | jpimedia

A memorial was set up at the site of the crash with a Justice4Harry poster and floral tributes.

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Green ribbons, inspired by Harry's love of Kawasaki, started appearing all over Croughton and the surrounding area as well as across the UK to show solidarity.

Sacoolas' lawyers released a statement expressing her deepest sympathies and saying she wanted to apologise to Harry's parents.

What did the politicians say?

The campaign led to Prime Minister Boris Johnson talking to US President Donald Trump about the family and they had a meeting with Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab, which they said did not go well.

The family then flew to the US to continue their campaign, which led to a meeting with Mr Trump in the Oval Office, who offered them the chance to talk to Sacoolas, which they declined.

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Despite the president's hospitality and sympathy, the family was told in no uncertain terms that Sacoolas would not be returning to the UK as she had diplomatic immunity.

Meanwhile Mr Raab told the House of Commons there was a discrepancy with the rules around diplomatic immunity at RAF Croughton and how it applied to spouses.

What happened to the police investigation?

Northamptonshire Police Chief Constable Nick Adderley held a press conference setting out what the force had done about the case and urging Sacoolas to return.

Officers flew to the US to interview Sacoolas with her agreement in late October, completing a file for the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS).

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As the family waited for a decision, they decide to sue the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the US State Department and Sacoolas as well as apply for a judicial review into the Government's handling of the case.

On December 20, the CPS finally charged Sacoolas with causing death by dangerous driving, starting the extradition process to force her to return to Britain and face the justice system.

So why was that not the end of it?

The US Government and Sacoolas' lawyers initially criticised the extradition application, sent on January 10, arguing it would be a grave precedent to set by overruling diplomatic immunity.

UK authorities and the family were hopeful Sacoolas would be sent back as the US had never rejected a British extradition application before.

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But the State Department's official rejection of the Home Office's request came on January 24.

What happened to the campaign?

Throughout the criminal and political procedures, the family and their growing supporters kept the issue in the public eye with interviews, protests outside Buckingham Palace and more.

Locally a mass motorbike ride-out was held around south Northamptonshire, as well as a rally in the car park of Tesco in Brackley and a demonstration outside RAF Croughton.

The general election in December gave them a chance to raise further awareness, with Harry's father, Tim Dunn, confronting Mr Raab at a hustings.

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The extradition request only spurred on the family, with another protest held outside the airbase and frequent television appearances for Harry's parents.

Further questions have been raised of the Government's handling of the case, especially after it was revealed Sacoolas used to work for the CIA.

Her background may be a sign of why the US authorities were so opposed to waiving her diplomatic immunity.

What else has the family done?

The family's campaign has grown to encompass all aspects of the issue, including road safety, RAF Croughton, ambulances and the US-UK relationship.

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Harry's loved ones say dozens of other families affected by crashes involving Americans driving on the wrong side of the road across the country have contacted them.

Northamptonshire Police has agreed with the bosses at RAF Croughton to offer extra driving training to their staff following other near-misses involving cars on the wrong side of the road.

The family also met with East Midlands Ambulance Service to discuss why it took so long for an ambulance to get to Harry after the crash.

What's next?

The family say they have been told the authorities are exploring all options to try to bring Sacoolas back to the UK.

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They still want to meet with Mr Johnson, who they say keeps ignoring their requests, while civil law suits and judicial review proceedings continue.

Ultimately Harry's bereaved parents, step-parents, siblings and wider supporters claim they will not give up until Sacoolas faces trial.