Banbury fundraiser recognised as leading the fight for every heartbeat

Julie Hieatt has been named Volunteer of the Year by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) for her fundraising efforts with the charity. NNL-150125-105436009
Julie Hieatt has been named Volunteer of the Year by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) for her fundraising efforts with the charity. NNL-150125-105436009

A dedicated fundraiser from Banbury has been named a regional Volunteer of the Year by the British Heart Foundation (BHF).

Julie Hieatt is a heart patient herself and has put in a incredible amount of hours to help in the fight against heart disease.

She won the award for the Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire area during Volunteers’ Week, which recognises the fantastic work of all volunteers in the UK.

She also works in the charity’s shop on Banbury’s High Street, and said: “I am delighted to have been given such a special award as there are so many worthy volunteers who give their time to the BHF.

“I am a relative newcomer to fundraising and feel inspired by other fundraisers in the area who have been doing much longer than I. The BHF are so supportive and there are so many different ways you can get involved.

“I would encourage anyone to volunteer for the BHF as it is such a rewarding experience and you get to meet the most fantastic and inspiring people.”

Julie scooped the award for her dedication to the charity, demonstrated by her fundraising efforts. She has held several events in the town to help raise its profile, including a coffee morning in February for BHF’S Wear It. Beat It Campaign.

Rachel Davis, fundraising volunteer manager at BHF for Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire, said: “I am delighted that we can recognise Julie’s commitment to the BHF.

“She is always at the forefront of all events and seems to effortlessly juggle numerous tasks at one time to help bring in as much money as possible. I would love for other people in Banbury to join our fight for every heartbeat in the UK.”

The charity currently provides the funding for about 500 post-doctoral scientists who work in research teams right across the country on projects to better understand how to diagnose, prevent, treat and cure heart disease.

Coronary heart disease is the country’s single biggest killer and strikes suddenly and unexpectedly.