Banbury cyclist raises £3k in London to Brighton Bike Ride

James Cummings (left) and another member of his team after completing the Brighton to London Bike Ride. Photo: British Heart Foundation/Danny Fitzpatrick
James Cummings (left) and another member of his team after completing the Brighton to London Bike Ride. Photo: British Heart Foundation/Danny Fitzpatrick

A Banbury man helped raise £3,000 for charity by cycling from London to Brighton in memory of a colleague who died of heart disease.

James Cummings was among 16,000 cyclists to take part in British Heart Foundation's London to Brighton Bike Ride on Sunday, June 17.

The 44-year-old man was part of a team of seven to raise the total for the charity and took on the challenge after his workmate Nigel Obone at construction firm FDL died two years ago.

“Taking part in the British Heart Foundation’s London to Brighton Bike Ride was such an incredible experience," he said.

"The atmosphere along the route was fantastic and I’m so proud to have been cycling for the BHF’s vital heart research.

"Knowing that I was raising money for such a great cause really spurred me on to the finish line – even on the steep climb up the dreaded Ditchling Beacon!

"I’m proud that the money I raised will help make a difference to the millions of people in the UK living with heart and circulatory disease.”

Now in its 43rd year, the London to Brighton Bike Ride is Europe’s oldest charity cycling event, and over the years has seen hundreds of thousands of cyclists pedalling over 41m miles, helping to raise nearly £70million for the fight against heart disease.

The iconic event saw thousands of riders of all abilities get on their bikes to ride the 54-mile course from Clapham Common, through the Surrey and Sussex countryside, finishing at Brighton’s seafront.

Riders celebrated crossing the finish line in the beach village on Brighton Beach having raised more than £3m for BHF’s work this year.

Event lead Elizabeth Tack said: “Without the dedication and commitment of people like James, we wouldn’t be able to fund research that has broken new ground, revolutionised treatments and transformed the lives of millions of people in the UK.

“The stories of why our amazing supporters take part never fails to amaze me and it was incredible to see James and around 16,000 others take on this iconic challenge, which will help us put the brakes on heart and circulatory disease for good.”