Once in a lifetime challenge for Banbury students

Jaguar Swallow Sidecar restoration that Banbury and Bicester College students will undertake NNL-190105-092824001
Jaguar Swallow Sidecar restoration that Banbury and Bicester College students will undertake NNL-190105-092824001

Students from Banbury and Bicester College will get a chance to restore a rare and beautiful piece of the UK’s motoring history.

The college has joined forces with Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust for a project which will see classic vehicle restoration students working on dismantled components of a Swallow sidecar to restore it into a fully assembled, finished product to a high standard. The components are believed to be from a very early Swallow Sidecar dating from around 1922/1923.

The project was officially launched by Michael Quinn, grandson of Jaguar founder Sir William Lyons, at the 
Activate Learning Technology Campus in Oxford on Tuesday.

Michael Quinn said: “I am delighted to be able to lend my support to this inspirational initiative.

“The skills and experience gained in the restoration of this example of my grandfather’s heritage will be invaluable to the students’ development, and I am pleased that the Jaguar Daimler 
Heritage Trust is in a position to be so closely involved in this way.”

Jaguar Heritage Trust has loaned the Swallow Sidecar to support classic vehicle restoration students’ learning at Banbury and Bicester College.

This key partnership project will see students try to retain the character of the original sidecar as they restore the former vehicle.

Lee Jamieson, director of curriculum for technology at Activate Learning, said: “This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for our classic restoration students.

“Thanks to our partnership with Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust, our students can develop industry standard restoration skills by working, hands on, to rebuild this important icon of UK motoring.

“This partnership will contribute two things to the vehicle restoration sector: an original Swallow Sidecar will be preserved for future generations to enjoy, and a new wave of young, enthusiastic engineers will enter an industry in short supply of skilled restoration talent.”

The vehicle requires extensive restoration work and will challenge the students’ knowledge and abilities while working with the dismantled components provided.