How an incredible gesture moved a headteacher near Banbury to tears

When the school didn't have enough room for a piano, the donor took matters into his own hands and came up with a fantastic solution

Thursday, 18th March 2021, 4:14 pm
Updated Thursday, 18th March 2021, 4:16 pm
Steven Trembath

When a kind donor was told that Wroxton CE Primary School did not have room for a piano, he took matters into his own hands - and decided to build a music room at the school.

The fantastic gesture brought tears to the eyes of the headteacher, who described it as a 'wow moment for this little village school'.

The story started when headteacher April Guiness received an email from Steven Trembath regarding a piano for school.

A young Steven Trembath on the piano.

Steven’s mum, Andree Trembath, who lived in the village, had recently passed away and Steven wanted a home for the very treasured baby Grand Piano which he had learnt to play on as a child.

Steven comes from a family of musicians and his great grandfather, Henry Gough Trembath, studied music at Oxford College and went on to be organist at Truro Cathederal in Cornwall.

Unfortunately the school had to say no due to limitations of space. However, Steven was not going to let a little thing like that stand in the way, declaring he would put his hand in his pocket and build a music room at the school.

Steven has secured the services of Peter Bell, architects based in Chiswick.

Henry Gough Trembath.

"What is affectionately known as ‘The Music Shed’ is going to be a space which will seat up to one hundred people, with onsite facilities including a green room, toilets, office, storage room and very importantly an inaugural rose garden in remembrance of Andree," said Mrs Guiness.

"Plans are underway as to what this fantastic space is going to look like architecturally.

"There are plans for much eco work with photo voltaics on the roof, wood finishes internally, and good insulation.

"This will give Wroxton CE Primary School children some amazing musical opportunities which would not be available ordinarily and will also be a space that can be used for the wider community for music."