Insurance expert warns attaching England flag to your car could land you with £2.5k fine

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An improperly attached emblem would be considered an unsecured load which could trigger a £300 on-the-spot fine or court appearance where the penalty rises to a maximum £2,500.

England supporters who drape red and white St George’s banners from their cars to back the Three Lions’ bid for glory at the summer soccer showpiece may end up under arrest and out of pocket.

Faulty flag flying from cars breaches a host of laws.

An improperly attached emblem would be considered an unsecured load which could trigger a £300 on-the-spot fine or court appearance where the penalty rises to a maximum £2,500.

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Faulty flag flying from cars breaches a host of lawsFaulty flag flying from cars breaches a host of laws
Faulty flag flying from cars breaches a host of laws

Driving with a flag that hinders the motorist’s view would be an obstructed vision offence carrying a £100 fine plus penalty points.

Attaching England memorabilia to number plates could attract a £1,000 fine.

Anything that could hide registrations from the UK’s 11,000 automatic number plate recognition cameras is taken 'very seriously’ by police, motoring insurers have warned.

Chris Richards, founder of insurance comparison site SimplyQuote, said: “Driving with flags is a tradition.

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“But too much enthusiasm combined with too little knowledge can spell trouble.

“It’s crucial to understand the legalities to avoid unwanted penalties.”

When flying flags from your car, there are several key points to keep in mind to ensure safety and compliance with the law.

Firstly, no banner should exceed the width of your vehicle. If it is too large, it can obscure your vision or that of other drivers. Opt for smaller flags that fit within your car’s limits. They are less likely to create blind spots or get blown away.

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Flags should be securely attached to the vehicle as loose ones can fly off and become a road hazard leading to accidents or causing disruptions. Use proper flag mounts, as many flags come with mounts that clip securely onto windows or car doors.

Under no circumstances should flags obstruct the driver’s view. This includes impairing visibility both directly and through mirrors. Place flags in a spot that doesn’t hinder any mirrors or your line of sight. Rear windows aren’t good options since they can block your rear view.

Your vehicle should be able to move safely without the fear of the flag interfering with driving or other vehicles. Additionally, flags should not cover your number plates. This is crucial as obscuring the plates is illegal and can bring hefty fines. Before you drive off, double-check that none of your flags cover any part of your registration plates.

Richards continued: “The excitement of the big game, the final whistle, your favourite team clinching victory. Naturally, you want to celebrate.

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“You drape yourself in the team’s colours, turn up the radio and drive around town with a football flag fluttering from your car. This is a scene repeated countless times across the UK.

“But the law can turn this joyous ride into a costly mistake. In the heat of football fever, it’s easy to forget that displaying flags on vehicles is subject to specific rules.

“What seems like harmless fun could land you a hefty fine. While celebrating your team’s success it’s important to keep road safety at the forefront.

“What starts as a celebration could quickly sour if you aren’t mindful. A misplaced flag can lead to fines that eclipse the joy of a win.

“Driving flags are an extension of your celebration, a sign of unity and joy. Let’s keep it that way. Understand the rules, follow them, and enjoy the victory dance safely.

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