DCSIMG

Frank Wise shares expertise with others

Head Teacher Sean O'Sullivan is pictured with Frank Wise pupils Ben Foster (9) and Libby Dos Santos (6).  Picture by Lucy Ford NNL-140605-145802009

Head Teacher Sean O'Sullivan is pictured with Frank Wise pupils Ben Foster (9) and Libby Dos Santos (6). Picture by Lucy Ford NNL-140605-145802009

Frank Wise School in Banbury has been awarded nearly £7,000 to turn its pupil assessment methods into a package for other schools to use.

The special school has developed and refined a series of assessments that screen the level of development of pupils’ basic cognitive skills.

In December, the Department for Education launched a competition encouraging schools to develop and share innovative new assessment methods.

Packages were then selected by an independent panel.

Frank Wise is one of just nine schools nationwide to receive the funding and one of only two special schools.

The money will be used to turn its model into a free, easy to use package for other schools to benefit from.

Simon Knight, deputy head teacher at Frank Wise School, said: “As a special school we are particularly pleased to be involved in this exciting project and to be able to share our approach to identifying gaps in expected cognitive development.

“This will provide an opportunity for more children to have their individual needs identified more quickly.”

Frank Wise’s assessments enable teachers to establish a baseline understanding of a child’s stage of development, allowing them to plan appropriately challenging targets for further learning.

This enables them to understand appropriate progression for children with atypical developmental patterns as well as to identify and address gaps in development which may result in delayed progress.

Frank Wise has also worked closely with local mainstream schools that have taken on aspects of the assessment to use in their own setting.

The new method will partly replace the current over-complicated, vague and unambitious levels system in schools, which will be scrapped in September.

A Deparment for Education spokesman said: “Our reforms are giving teachers the freedom to do what they know is best for their pupils – not Whitehall bureaucrats.

“That’s why we want schools taking control and creating models of assessment which they know will work and which will suit them.

“These packages will give far more useful information to parents about how their child is performing and will provide valuable information to schools.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page

 

X scottish independence image

Keep up-to-date with all the latest Referendum news