Chipping Norton heart charity calls on US police to carry life-saving equipment at FBI conference

Trudie Lobban, founder of the Arrhythmia Alliance, with a public access defibrillator. NNL-170708-095712001
Trudie Lobban, founder of the Arrhythmia Alliance, with a public access defibrillator. NNL-170708-095712001

A Chipping Norton heart charity has taken its campaign for defibrillators to become commonplace to the FBI.

Founder and trustee of the Arrhythmia Alliance, Trudie Lobban, attended the FBI’s National Academy Associates conference in Washington DC, to call on delegates and police chiefs across the US to place an automated external defibrillator (AED) in every police vehicle.

The charity has an affiliate office in the US and has launched its Defibs Save Lives campaign. It has seen the placing of AEDs in communities in the UK and the US.

Ms Lobban said: “To be recognized by the FBI, and to partner with them, through the Arrhythmia Alliance – Defibs Save Lives campaign across the United States is a tremendous honour for our organisation. However, we continue to push for greater access and awareness of AEDs in the UK to ensure many people’s lives are saved from sudden cardiac arrest, the UK’s number one killer – more than lung cancer, breast cancer and HIV/AIDs combined.”

She added the charity’s vision was to make AEDs as common as fire extinguishers and smoke alarms. In the UK 250 people a day suffer a heart attack and an AED increases someone’s chance of survival from five per cent to 50 per cent.

For more information see www.defibssavelives.org