Brave Lucy’s Snowdon walk raises £1,300 for charity

Lucy McNally at the summit of Snowdon
Lucy McNally at the summit of Snowdon

Ten-year-old Lucy McNally ‘flew up’ Snowdon in her bid to folllow her great grandad’s example and raise money for Parkinson’s sufferers.

The plucky schoolgirl, accompanied by her Dad, Matthew, ascended Wales’ highest mountain in two hours, 40 minutes.

Lucy McNally with dad Matthew at the top of Snowdon

Lucy McNally with dad Matthew at the top of Snowdon

And she was met at the summit by her proud great grandad, Peter Turner MBE who gave her a huge hug.

Lucy, a pupil of Hornton Primary School, has raised £1,300 for Parkinson’s UK.

Lucy’s mum Kerri McNally said: “Lucy and Matthew just flew up the mountain. They even overtook a group of young men who had been training for their ascent for six months.”

Lucy got the fundraising bug two years ago when she did a sponsored ten-mile cycle ride for the Teenage Cancer Trust.

Lucy McNally at the summit of Snowdon with her Great Grandad Peter Turner MBE

Lucy McNally at the summit of Snowdon with her Great Grandad Peter Turner MBE

This time she decided to raise funds for Parkinson’s UK, following in her great grandad’s footsteps.

“We spent five days in Snowdonia and the Tuesday of the climb was the only good day. It was perfect - with sunshine and clear skies,” said Mrs McNally.

“Grandad was overwhelmed - over the moon at her achievement. He went up to the summit on the Snowdon railway and other passengers gave him donations for Lucy’s fund.

“It has been a phenomenal effort and well worth doing. They spent an hour at the top having a rest and a drink and then walked down. It was about a six and a half hour excursion in all. She was absolutely beat afterwards.

Lucy McNally took two hours 40 minutes to walk up Snowdon

Lucy McNally took two hours 40 minutes to walk up Snowdon

“She may take a break from fundraising next year but is talking about doing Ben Nevis or walking the Pennine Way as her next challenge,” she said.

Mr Turner, now 86, spent a lifetime raising money to help those with Parkinson’s - a condition his wife Dot suffered from for many years.

The couple had moved to Banbury from Birmingham when Mr Turner got a job at General Foods.

Dot - who spent years working as a barmaid at the Reindeer Inn - was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease at a very young age when there was little support for people with the condition.

Lucy looks down on the valley below

Lucy looks down on the valley below

As part of his fundraising, Mr Turner opened a charity shop in Middleton Cheney.

The revenue paid for a specialist Parkinson’s nurse to help sufferers over many years.

“Dot died in 2006 at Katharine House Hospice. She was in her 70s and Grandad had cared for her right up to the end,” said Mrs McNally.

Mr Turner still helps take members of the local group away on holidays to locations with disabled-friendly hotels.

“Lucy is very like him, always thinking up something. She certainly has her great grandfather’s drive,” said Mrs McNally.